What are the most important things to share with your global audience?

You have reached readers in 193 countries. What advice do you have for others?

  1. If a parent can love more than one child, a child can love more than one parent. 
  2. No child should be forced to decide between their adopted parents and birth parents. 
  3. Increasing the number of connections with people increases the number of individuals you have to love and those who love you in return. 
  4. Difficult beginnings can have cheerful, happy endings. 
  5. After discovering my birth family, my relationship with my adopted parents greatly improved. My appreciation for them increased, and I was more grateful for our shared memories and the positive influences they provided. 
  6. Knowing the truth and facing reality is enlightening. 
  7. Knowing your medical history is essential for many individuals. 
  8. The emotional depth of some moments in life is so overwhelming that God can only resolve them—but it is up to the individual to make the connection.
  9. Those who don’t read have no advantage over those who can’t.

Judith Land, Author of Adoption Detective: Memoir of an Adopted Child

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.adoptiondetectivejudithland.com

“A powerful personal story that belongs in the Pantheon of Adoption Classics. I was deeply moved by the heartbreaking narrative of this adoptee, but at the same time, the mystery buff in me breathlessly turned the pages to find out how or if Judy finally finds her truth. As you read this shocking and amazing book, keep reminding yourself: This really happened.” Donna Montalbano 

 

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What conclusions did you draw from your experience?

Ancestral recovery was a peak emotional experience, an extraordinary moment that took my breath away, liberated my spirit, and gave me the confidence to soar like an eagle. 

Destiny is not preordained—it’s about making choices. Our lives are the sum of all our options, the bridges we cross, and the ones we burn. Our souls cast long shadows over many people, even after we are gone. Fate, luck, and providence are consequences of our freedom of choice, not the determinants. When justice is served by following our principles, making good decisions brings inner peace. Happiness is a mental state of well-being characterized by positive emotions ranging from contentment to intense joy. 

At this point in my life, I have much to be thankful for and many reasons to celebrate. 

Judith Land, Author of Adoption Detective: Memoir of an Adopted Child

http://www.adoptiondetectivejudithland.com

“Judith Land’s adoption reunion story is a roller-coaster of emotional beauty, turmoil, and closure that captured and held my attention. The deep emotional scars that are revealed and explored accurately represent many adoptees’ experiences. Rejection, secrecy, Christian values, and the falsification of crucial life documents are themes explored in this poignant memoir. Adoptees and birth mothers will find themselves on every page of this book and may find refreshing new ideas on how to perceive and embrace their adoption roles. Judy displays her deep-seated understanding of all sides here.” V.L. Brunskill 

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What are the key personal attributes needed to do an adoption search?

You must work hard work and make a serious commitment. Mastering the art of psycho-cybernetics to visualize positive outcomes is highly beneficial. Empathy for the feelings and emotions of others is essential.

Conducting an adoption search requires resilience to conquer adversity, perseverance to overcome injustice, and persistence to make your dreams come true. Many facets of life and personal psychology make it easy to spend a lifetime analyzing and dwelling on past events. Still, staying focused on the present and moving forward into the future is best. They call it the present because it is a gift. It is important to remain optimistic and stay focused on cheerful endings.

Rainbows are elusive; you must act when the timing is right to find your reward’s pot of gold. 

Judith Land, Author of Adoption Detective: Memoir of an Adopted Child

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.adoptiondetectivejudithland.com

“Judith Land’s adoption reunion story is a roller-coaster of emotional beauty, turmoil, and closure that captured and held my attention. The deep emotional scars that are revealed and explored accurately represent many adoptees’ experiences. Rejection, secrecy, Christian values, and the falsification of crucial life documents are themes explored in this poignant memoir. Adoptees and birth mothers will find themselves on every page of this book and may find refreshing new ideas on how to perceive and embrace their adoption roles. Judy displays her deep-seated understanding of all sides here.” V.L. Brunskill 

 

 

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Why did you choose the title Adoption Detective

My origin was a mystery. I knew nothing of my beginnings, the reasons for my birth, parents, and adoption. Every child is curious and believes in their heart they are a born detective. My journey was exciting, emotionally charged, technical, and filled with mystery, intrigue, and suspense. The adventure I experienced had all the elements of a good detective novel. I imagined myself as a master detective throughout the lengthy discovery process, gradually acquiring the skills needed to master the elegant art of detection. In the beginning, I had almost no clues to get started.

Finding my roots was a complicated process that stimulated me to investigate every sign and signal using intuitive and deductive reasoning. The heroine of this story is hardly a traditional detective. Still, by its very nature, genealogy leads to detection, deduction, and conclusions that are not always what the genealogist or adoptee had in mind. 

Judith Land, Author of Adoption Detective: Memoir of an Adopted Child

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.adoptiondetectivejudithland.com

“Judith Land’s adoption reunion story is a roller-coaster of emotional beauty, turmoil, and closure that captured and held my attention. The deep emotional scars that are revealed and explored accurately represent many adoptees’ experiences. Rejection, secrecy, Christian values, and the falsification of crucial life documents are themes explored in this poignant memoir. Adoptees and birth mothers will find themselves on every page of this book and may find refreshing new ideas on how to perceive and embrace their adoption roles. Judy displays her deep-seated understanding of all sides here.” V.L. Brunskill

 

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What did you say after you said hello to your birth parents?

It was apparent to my birth parents from the beginning that I wanted a continuing relationship to get to know them better in the future. Sometimes, warm hugs and silence translate our deepest feelings toward others better than words.

I learned that life is about making choices and building relationships—actions that can only happen if you take the initiative. The outcome of an adoption search may rest in the hands of fate or prayer. Still, desire and passion provide the fuel to overcome self-doubt and internal resistance to assure desired long-term outcomes. Relatives don’t automatically make the best friends, and connecting with others is often an emotional challenge. Still, I was determined to establish a meaningful relationship and continue a positive dialogue with them to discover the answers to the questions I was seeking.

Ultimately, my efforts’ positive emotional benefits and rewards are boundless. 

Judith Land, Author of Adoption Detective: Memoir of an Adopted Child

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.adoptiondetectivejudithland.com

“This is an extraordinarily riveting story. I was immediately drawn in and could not put the book down. The narrative is structured so that the suspense never lets up as the discovery process unfolds. There are many surprises, redemptive moments, and amazing human complexities revealed throughout. As an adoptive parent, I really valued the author’s honest reflections on her struggles and her serious and thoughtful critique of the institution of adoption.” Anne Bernard Becker

 

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What motivated you to search for your birth parents?

I spent my childhood quietly wondering and longing for something intangible that seemed missing in my life. I never gave up hope or stopped scanning the universe for my biological parents because I was confident I would someday find them.

The ghostly image I had of my birth mother was something that haunted me throughout my childhood. Even though I had never seen her face, I often thought of her. I instinctually began as a wee life, longing for the warmth and protection of my birth mother to survive. The umbilical cord was physically severed, but our unnatural separation heightened the spiritual connection that bound me to my birth mother. Maybe I possessed a biological gene in my DNA that drove me to succeed. Using my sixth sense, I never gave up scanning the universe for esoteric signals emanating from her essence. I was subconsciously longing to be with her. I used intuition and wishful thinking to connect with what was intuitively familiar in every way possible.

I wanted to know why my mother gave me up for adoption, my family medical history, and my social and cultural heritage. I wanted to be with others who shared my same flesh and blood. I was curious if we looked alike, had identical habits, or had similar personal preferences.

Ultimately, my drive to find my roots was spiritual and inspired by God. 

Judith Land, Author of Adoption Detective: Memoir of an Adopted Child

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.adoptiondetectivejudithland.com

“A powerful personal story that belongs in the Pantheon of Adoption Classics. I was deeply moved by the heartbreaking narrative of this adoptee, but at the same time, the mystery buff in me breathlessly turned the pages to find out how or if Judy finally finds her truth. As you read this shocking and amazing book, keep reminding yourself: This really happened.” Donna Montalbano

 

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How did you feel when you learned you were adopted?

I needed spontaneous love and assurance at that moment because it was disappointing knowing that Rosella was not my mother. I reacted tentatively. I internalized my opinions and feelings, and my body language remained rigid. I was uncomfortable, and I had difficulty expressing myself. I was baffled. Why was I adopted? I was curious if any of my girlfriends were adopted. I was happy knowing that my parents chose me because I was special. 

Still, in hindsight, I wondered if the deepest part of my brain was already conscious of our genetic dissimilarities. Knowing that I was adopted caused me to be more aware of my unique individuality and temperament. My dreams and fantasies became dominated by ghostly images of my birth mother, and the idea of connecting with her became a spiritual goal. 

From a humorous standpoint, I was pleased to know I was adopted and quick to distance myself from my adopted parents whenever they did something embarrassing in public.

Judith Land, Author of Adoption Detective: Memoir of an Adopted Child

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.adoptiondetectivejudithland.com

“This is an extraordinarily riveting story. I was immediately drawn in and could not put the book down. The narrative is structured so that the suspense never lets up as the discovery process unfolds. There are many surprises, redemptive moments, and amazing human complexities revealed throughout. As an adoptive parent, I really valued the author’s honest reflections on her struggles and her serious and thoughtful critique of the institution of adoption.” Anne Bernard Becker

 

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Who would benefit from reading Adoption Detective?

  1. Everyone enjoys the continuous excitement, mystery, evolving vicissitudes of fortune, and the thrill of a good detective adventure story.
  2. Adoption is a social topic as old as a recorded civilization that resonates globally with people of all ages.
  3. Over sixty percent of the American population is affected by a personal account of adoption, according to a 1997 Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute survey.
  4. Adoptees researching their birth records, DNA, and medical history and investigating ancestral trees may become inspired to learn more, including studying history, geography, and culture.
  5. Birth mothers may demonstrate a more profound concern for their children’s mental health and take a more active interest in their future welfare.
  6. Adoptive parents will gain insight into the minds of adopted children.
  7. The public will become more aware of the psychological trauma of adoption.

Judith Land, Author of Adoption Detective: Memoir of an Adopted Child

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.adoptiondetectivejudithland.com

“This is an extraordinarily riveting story. I was immediately drawn in and could not put the book down. The narrative is structured so that the suspense never lets up as the discovery process unfolds. There are many surprises, redemptive moments, and amazing human complexities revealed throughout. As an adoptive parent, I really valued the author’s honest reflections on her struggles and her serious and thoughtful critique of the institution of adoption.” Anne Bernard Becker

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What is unique about your adoption story?

A Dear Mom letter at the beginning of every chapter summarizes Judith Romano’s dreams, feelings, and aspirations. The letters highlight her emotional responses to the significant events in her life as if arising from some external creative impulse. 

The narrative provides clarity and insight into the mind of an adoptee as her thinking evolves from infancy, childhood, and teen years, through a succession of harrowing passages leading into adulthood. Her adventure unfolds as a series of significant events and her deep psychological reactions to them. 

 Throughout her search for the truth, Judith Romano faces a nearly insurmountable challenge in finding her roots. Still, her tenacious approach to problem-solving eventually demonstrates the power of the individual to defeat adversity. To create a positive outcome for herself, she must make tough moral and ethical choices and work within a biased, secretive social system established to work against her. She must overcome her fear of rejection, conquer her inhibitions, inner turmoil, and emotions, and resolve complex legal constraints. Her opinions about the value of self-identity and family connections are educational and inspirational. Readers will gain insight into the mind of an adoptee from infancy, through the developmental years, and into adulthood. 

Judith Romano’s mature awareness and in-depth analysis of the circumstances that shaped the extraordinary quality of her life, will enlighten and inspire others about what it means to be adopted. Readers will learn to understand and appreciate how adoptees feel about adoption both then and now. 

Judith Land, Author of Adoption Detective: Memoir of an Adopted Child

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.adoptiondetectivejudithland.com

“A powerful personal story that belongs in the Pantheon of Adoption Classics. I was deeply moved by the heartbreaking narrative of this adoptee, but at the same time, the mystery buff in me breathlessly turned the pages to find out how or if Judy finally finds her truth. As you read this shocking and amazing book, keep reminding yourself: This really happened.” Donna Montalbano

 

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What do you remember most about your childhood?

As a child, I quietly longed for something intangible that I perceived was missing in my life. Everything that had ever happened to me lingered in my imagination. After discovering that I was adopted, I wondered why my mother gave me up for adoption. Wondering where I came from was important to me. Knowing I was adopted was a complex issue that affected my thinking as a child. Separation from my biological roots and foster family encouraged visions of my birth mother inspired by vague memories, mystical dreams, and childhood fantasies.

Over time I gradually acquired the habit of scanning the faces of strangers, searching for others with physical features and emotional feelings similar to mine, hoping to connect with a relative. I became highly observant of other families in my neighborhood and naturally gravitated toward surrogate parents that felt right. I considered similar-looking people to be my imaginary biological family.

Knowing that I was adopted shook my foundation and sense of self, but my optimism and hope that my life would turn out all right in the end never wavered.

Judith Land, Author of Adoption Detective: Memoir of an Adopted Child

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://judithland.wordpress.com

“Judith Land’s adoption reunion story is a roller-coaster of emotional beauty, turmoil, and closure that captured and held my attention. The deep emotional scars that are revealed and explored accurately represent many adoptees’ experiences. Rejection, secrecy, Christian values, and the falsification of crucial life documents are themes explored in this poignant memoir. Adoptees and birth mothers will find themselves on every page of this book and may find refreshing new ideas on how to perceive and embrace their adoption roles. Judy displays her deep-seated understanding of all sides here.” V.L. Brunskill

 

Posted in adopted, adoptee, Adoption, Children, Judith Land, Parenting | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment