Adoption—Trauma and Dissociation

“The psychological effects of early parental loss have been ruminated on since ancient times. Infants are vulnerable and dependent on the maternal bond with the mother. Separation comprises everything that they know. The latent effects of the emotional pain caused by early childhood attachment loss are known to be deep-rooted, long-lasting, and profound. Separation from the primary attachment figure constitutes a trauma, which may precipitate a dissociative response that may look like a totally frozen state of mind, or a mild zoning out, so low-key, that you may not even notice that you spaced out.” Judith Land

Adoption Detective | Judith Land | Dissociation

“Dissociation is a way that the mind copes with too much stress. It is a normal response that allows people to distance themselves from a trauma that would otherwise be unbearable. Symptoms include amnesia, depersonalization, derealisation, and identity confusion. People who dissociate feel disconnected from the world around them.” Judith Land

Adoptees experience a higher prevalence of dissociative anxiety as a means of coping with the loss of the first attachment bond. They have more conduct and behavior problems, including hyperactivity, aggressiveness, delinquency, conduct disorder, conflicts with peers, and running away. They tend to have a significantly higher prevalence of depression and reactive attachment disorder. This is particularly true with emotionally stranded adoptees torn between two cultures and two families, and adolescents lacking a cohesive sense of identity, with a significant part of themselves attached to their biological heritage.

Disassociation is a psychological defense mechanism associated with post-traumatic stress disorder, including daydreaming, highway hypnosis, losing touch, becoming inattentive and distracted, and mentally remote; a complex psychological condition linked to a history of trauma, lapses of attention, compromised emotional memory, and a disintegrated sense of self associated with a loss of memory and amnesia. Victims feel emotionally numb, detached from others and their surroundings, and disconnected from the world around them. Symptoms include daydreaming, spacing out, eyes glazed over, and changes in behavior due to an emotional overload triggering anxiety.

Dissociation is of great concern in the therapeutic treatment of adopted individuals because this pattern of behavior threatens harm to the quality of personal relationships and self-evaluation. Adoptees with this condition should seek advice and practice grounding techniques.

Contact Judith Land

http://www.adoptiondetectivejudithland.com

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About Judith Land

Judith Land lives in Colorado and Arizona with husband and coauthor Martin Land. Judith is a former nurse, retail shop owner, college instructor and avid outdoor person. Her book "Adoption Detective: Memoir of an Adopted Child" is a true story detailing the journey of Judith Romano, foster child and adoptee, as she discovers fragments of her background, and then sets out to solve the mystery as an adult. She has reached readers in 192 countries. "Mothers and fathers everywhere in the world need to understand that children are forever and always." --Judith Land
This entry was posted in adopted, adoptee, Adoption, Children, Parenting and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Adoption—Trauma and Dissociation

  1. Congratulations. It’s great that the Government’s past history is catching up on them. Being found out messing with the minds of children. Great there is soooooo much light on the Adoption and fostering money making agencies to be placed on the carpets of shame. Here’s to change.

    On Sun, 5 Apr 2020, 9:30 pm Adoption Detective: Memoir of an Adopted Child, wrote:

    > Judith Land posted: ““The psychological effects of early parental loss > have been ruminated on since ancient times. Infants are vulnerable and > dependent on the maternal bond with the mother. Separation comprises > everything that they know. The latent effects of the emotional pa” >

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