“Adoption and Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs”

Abraham Harold Maslow (1908–1970), an American professor of psychology, founded humanistic psychology. He was best known for his theory of psychological health predicated on fulfilling innate human needs in priority, culminating in self-actualization. Humanistic psychology theory suits people who see the positive side of humanity and believe in free will. Humanistic psychologists believe that every person has a strong desire to realize his or her full potential, to reach a level of self-actualization.

“Finding my roots and meeting my birth parents was a peak experience—an extraordinary moment of ‘self-actualization’ that left me feeling more self-directing, emotionally stronger, mentally wiser, and significantly more self-confident with fewer doubts and insecurities. Knowing my true identity makes me feel like an eagle high above Maslow’s ‘hierarchy of needs pyramid’, full of confidence, mature, and skilled, and able to soar in the direction of my choosing. My new sense of well-being is liberating and gives me a spontaneous will to live life to the fullest.”  —Judith Land adoptee

Maslow's_Hierarchy_of_Needs.svg | Adoption Detective

“Hierarchy of needs pyramid” —Maslow stressed the importance of focusing on the positive qualities in people. Humanistic psychology theory suits people who see the positive side of humanity and believe in free will. Humanistic psychologists believe that every person has a strong desire to realize his or her full potential, to reach a level of self-actualization. Maslow wrote that there are certain conditions that must be fulfilled in order for the basic needs to be satisfied. For example, freedom of speech, freedom to express oneself, and freedom to seek new information (original birth certificate) are a few of the prerequisites. Any blockages of these freedoms could prevent the satisfaction of the basic needs.

A visual aid psychologist Abraham Harlow created to explain his theory, known as the ‘hierarchy of needs’, is a pyramid depicting the levels of human needs, with the basic psychological and physical needs of food, water, and sleep at the bottom. The next level is safety, security, order and stability, followed by the need to love and belonging. The fourth level is the esteem level, including self-esteem, confidence, achievement and respect. When a human being ascends the steps of the pyramid, he reaches self-actualization.

Beyond the routine of needs fulfillment, Maslow envisioned moments of extraordinary experience, known as peak experiences, profound moments of love, understanding, happiness, or rapture, during which a person feels more whole, alive, self sufficient, and yet a part of the world. Self-actualizing people have many such peak experiences. They are more aware of truth, justice, harmony, goodness, and so on. Self actualized people are driven by innate forces beyond their basic needs, so that they may explore and reach their full human potential. Overcoming genealogical bewilderment through ancestry recovery was a moment of self-actualization that created a peak experience for Judith Romano in the book Adoption Detective (page 273).

Judith Land | Adoption Detective | Adoption Story

http://www.adoptiondetectivejudithland.com

Abraham Harold Maslow (1908-1970), ein amerikanischer Professor für Psychologie, gründete der humanistischen Psychologie. Eine Sehhilfe Psychologe Abraham Harlow geschaffen, um seine Theorie, als die “Hierarchie der Bedürfnisse” bekannt, ist eine Pyramide mit die Ebenen varios der menschlichen Bedürfnisse zu erklären.

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About Judith Land

Judith Land lives in Colorado and Arizona with husband and coauthor Martin Land. Judith is a former nurse, retail shop owner, college instructor and avid outdoor person. Her book "Adoption Detective: Memoir of an Adopted Child" is a true story detailing the journey of Judith Romano, foster child and adoptee, as she discovers fragments of her background, and then sets out to solve the mystery as an adult. "Mothers and fathers everywhere in the world need to understand that children are forever and always." --Judith Land
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3 Responses to “Adoption and Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs”

  1. Pingback: “Adoption search—a sense of urgency!” | Adoption Detective | A True Story by Judith Land

  2. Pingback: Adoption—can happiness be learned? | Adoption Detective | A True Story by Judith Land

  3. Pingback: The adoption narrative—what is the thematic conflict of your adoption story? | Adoption Detective | A True Story by Judith Land

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